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EIA’s wildlife campaign delivers lasting protections for some of the world's most iconic species threatened by illegal trade and habitat degradation.

EIA’s wildlife campaign focuses on stopping the illegal and unsustainable killing of, and trade in, threatened and endangered species including elephants, rhinos, whales, dolphins, and porpoises, from the African savannah to Japan’s coastal waters. Since its inception in 1984, EIA has been dedicated to protecting our world’s wildlife, relying on the best available scientific and trade data and intelligence from investigations, to support policies and actions that protect threatened and endangered species. Our impact on wildlife protection has been global, lasting, and profound.

African elephants are in the midst of a global poaching crisis—more than 30,000 elephants a year are being killed for their ivory. Our investigations and research expose the illegal ivory trade where it is found, and we work to ensure that nations pass and enforce stronger regulations to shut down domestic markets. Rhinos face a similar poaching epidemic, fueled by demand for their horns to craft faux medical cures. Using every tool at our disposal, we are committed to ending the current elephant and rhino poaching crisis. EIA also leads global efforts to protect the world’s whales, dolphins, and porpoises (or cetaceans), under attack from threats such as commercial hunting, pollution, marine debris, and a changing climate. We are committed to ensuring these magnificent animals are protected from the vast range of threats they face.

By investigating and exposing ivory trade where it is found, EIA fights for stronger regulations to shut down all ivory trade, including at the domestic level, and increase protections for elephants.
Objectives:
  • Ensure a secure long-term future for Africa’s wild elephant populations
  • Close down all ivory markets, domestic and international
  • End elephant poaching and trafficking of elephant products
By prompting key countries to act, EIA is fighting to stop the out-of-control poaching of rhinos.
Objectives:
  • Ensure a secure long-term future for all five wild rhino species
  • Close all markets for rhino horn, international and domestic
  • End rhino poaching and the trafficking in rhino horn
EIA is working to ensure protection for the white beluga whale, a species that faces an uncertain future in a rapidly warming and increasingly industrialized Arctic.
Objectives:
  • Improve understanding of the conservation status and major threats posed to all 29 populations of beluga whales
  • Protect the critical habitat of beluga populations from industrial impacts
  • Oppose all offshore drilling in the Arctic as unsafe for the environment and the global climate
  • Support the establishment of marine protected areas and other lasting spatial and ecological protections for belugas and other species

Recent Blog Posts

Room for Improvement: Using DNA Analysis to Address Rhino Horn Trafficking
09/22/2021
Law enforcement officials from around the world have seized illegal supplies of rhino horn at least once a week on average for the past 10 years. The type of seizure ranges widely. It could be a pair of fresh horns confiscated from poachers who just gunned down a rhino inside a national park. Or possibly dozens of horns were discovered cleverly hidden in an air cargo shipment. Sometime it’s just a few grams of powdered horn found in a traveler’s luggage. Maybe a mix of raw and carved horns was seized after a police raid on a trafficker’s home.
Still Waiting for Action: Tokyo's Ivory Trade Assessment
08/11/2021
The reality of the scope and impact of COVID-19 hit home for much of the world when the Tokyo 2020 Games were postponed. A year later and looking far different than ever expected or hoped, the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games finally arrived. As the host of the 2020 Games, Tokyo has come under increased scrutiny for its legal market for elephant ivory. Even as the Games were underway, the influential capital city faced mounting international pressure to close its legal ivory market for good. For World Elephant Day 2021, in between the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, we take a look at where Tokyo stands in doing its part to protect the world's elephants from the threats of ivory trade and poaching. 

Recent Reports

Letter: NGOs Make Recommendations for Tokyo Ivory Market Closure
10/07/2021
EIA and 30 international non-government environmental and conservation organizations sent a letter October 7, 2021, following up on previous appeals to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government (TMG). Our organizations continue to urge Tokyo to close the market for elephant ivory and make specific recommendations in the letter to the TMG for moving forward. The letter can be viewed in English and Japanese.
Letter: NGO Appeal to the Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games
06/25/2021
: EIA, JTEF, and HSI appeal to the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee President and Governor of Tokyo to take action to prevent illegal trade and export of elephant ivory products

Recent Press Releases

Tokyo Fumbles Short-Term Ivory Trade Action
06/25/2021
Conservation, environmental and animal welfare groups bemoaned measures announced today by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government to address Tokyo’s illegal ivory trade as a missed opportunity. Tokyo’s short-term plan is focused only on consumer awareness and falls dramatically short of expectations for substantive action, instead replicating previous failed awareness efforts by Japan’s national government.
Japanese Retailers Willing to Sell Ivory Hanko for Illegal Export
12/17/2020
Investigations of Japanese hanko retailers revealed that many are willing to sell an ivory product knowing that it will be exported internationally despite most being aware that ivory export is illegal.

Impact and Results

“Throughout the entire policy-making process, EIA was perceived as the most active and well-known agent, being ascribed [as]…having an expert status on the topic…committed and well-connected…as builder of the [coalition].”
– “Divide and Conquer – Discursive agency in the politics of illegal logging in the United States,” Global Environmental Change, November 2015

For over a quarter century, EIA has been recognized by government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and independent journals, like Global Environmental Change above, for its extraordinary work on the ground and at the heart of solving global environmental problems. Our team can be found in the field working with civil society collecting information, deeply entrenched in research and data analysis, and at international negotiating platforms poised to propose solutions that work.

Our interlocking campaign program works to protect threatened wildlife, forests, and our global climate. Divided among these three core areas, we are determined to protect the environment with intelligence.


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