If you are looking for EIA UK, it's overhere.

MONTREAL PROTOCOL TAKES STEPS TO CRACK DOWN ON ILLEGAL OZONE-KILLER CFCs

WASHINGTON, D.C: The 30th Meeting of the Parties (MoP30) to the Montreal Protocol closed in Quito, Ecuador, on Friday 9th November with a decision on immediate next steps to understand and address CFC-11 emissions. EIA commends the sense of urgency and commitment expressed by the Parties in taking immediate action to respond to the unexpected emissions of CFC-11.

The issue of alarmingly high unexplained CFC-11 emissions was brought to light initially by scientists in a letter to Nature. Subsequent investigations by EIA identified illegal production and use of CFC-11 in China for the polyurethane (PU) foam insulation sector as the likely root cause.

Prior to the meeting, the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) released a new report, Tip of the Iceberg: Implications of Illegal CFC Production and Use, examining the implications of the illegal CFC use, including the creation of new bank of CFC-11 in foams, which EIA estimates may have potentially already reached nearly 4Gt CO2 equivalent.

Montreal Protocol Parties have now adopted a decision that requests information to be provided for the next meeting on atmospheric CFC-11 levels, potential sources of emissions of CFC-11 along with an analysis of current monitoring, reporting and verification under the Protocol. The decision also calls on Parties to take measures to ensure the phase-out of CFC-11 is sustained in their countries and to share information relating to any illegal CFC-11 production or use. During the discussion, China shared information on a nation-wide enforcement effort that has resulted in the discovery of two CFC-11 illegal production sites.

“The unprecedented enforcement actions reported by China and the unanimous support for tasking Montreal Protocol institutions to get to the bottom of this issue within months of the scientific alarm bells is an example of why the Montreal Protocol is often hailed as the most successful environmental treaty,” said Avipsa Mahapatra, EIA US Climate Campaign Lead. “However, it is critical to invest in systemic changes to aid continued compliance and also address the related issue of refrigerant banks, which could avoid up to 97 billion tonnes of carbon emissions equivalent globally between 2020 and 2050.”

Clare Perry, EIA UK Climate Campaigns Leader, said, “China is to be commended for taking immediate action to uncover and address illegal CFC-11 production and use and the Parties to the Montreal Protocol have demonstrated their united desire to address this environmental crisis, but we still face huge challenges to fix this problem. This is a turning point for the Montreal Protocol – nothing less than a comprehensive overhaul of its compliance and enforcement regime will ensure that this doesn’t happen again.”

Parties to the Montreal Protocol also agreed provisions for reporting of HFCs under the Kigali Amendment, which will come into force in January 2019, and adopted a decision on energy efficiency which directs the Protocol’s financial mechanism to consider additional funding for low volume consuming countries and mobilize additional resources for energy efficiency through collaboration with other financial institutions.

View all Press Releases

Recent Blog Posts

Unkept Promises: Chemours Newest Targets Miss the Mark
04/16/2021
Following EIA’s call to cease irresponsible operations and subsequent mounting press pressure, the American chemical giant, the Chemours company released a new statement on their climate goals yesterday.
Major Climate Win: Lessons for the Montreal Protocol
02/10/2021
Two new papers published in Nature suggest that the CFC-11 emissions are back on a downward trajectory potentially avoiding substantial delays in the recovery of the ozone layer. The papers show an accelerated decline in global atmospheric concentrations of CFC-11 from 2018 to 2019, and attribute 60% of the decline to China. This is a huge win for the ozone layer and our climate, which would not have been possible without a concerted global response to the findings from the ground and the atmosphere.

Recent Reports

EIA briefing to OEWG43: Unexpected CFC-11 emissions
07/09/2021
Briefing to the 43rd Meeting of the Open-ended Working Group of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (OEWG 43)
Template: Letter of Support for EIA AIM Act Petition
04/13/2021
Interested organizations can submit a letter of support for EIA’s petition to EPA to restrict HFC uses under the AIM Act. Please download the attached template above to submit a letter to newberg.cindy@epa.gov.

Recent Press Releases

First-Ever Walmart Shareholder Resolution on Climate-Damaging Refrigerants Passes Key Threshold for Support
06/02/2021
Today, Walmart investors voted on the first-ever shareholder resolution on refrigerants and their related climate impacts. The initial count indicates 5.5 percent of investors voted in favor of the proposal filed by Rhode Island Treasurer Seth Magaziner, urging Walmart to disclose how it will limit its impact on climate change by increasing the scale, pace, and rigor of its plans to significantly scale back hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in its operations.
U.S. EPA Proposes Landmark Climate Rule to Initiate HFC Phase-down
05/03/2021
Today the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a proposed rulemaking to establish an allocation system for the phasedown of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). The proposed rule is the first step to implement the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act (AIM Act), the new climate law that sets the U.S. on course for compliance with the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol. The rule proposes an allowance allocation and trading system, which will determine the amount of HFCs an entity can produce or consume, and create the mechanism to phase-down domestic HFCs.

Recent Videos

Leaking Havoc: Exposing Your Supermarket’s Invisible Climate Pollution
02/15/2021
An EIA investigation into dozens of supermarkets in the greater Washington, D.C. area, including Virginia and Maryland, found a majority of stores to be leaking super-pollutant hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants
Japan’s Ivory Trade Faces Intensifying Opposition at Home and Abroad (Japanese Subtitles)
10/29/2019
Japan’s Ivory Trade Faces Intensifying Opposition at Home and Abroad
What are the HFC-free Technologies?
Widespread adoption of HFC-free technologies is cost-effective, energy efficient, and climate-friendly. Read EIA’s report Putting the Freeze on HFCs for hundreds of examples of HFC-free technologies available and in use today.
A Global HFC Phase-down
The October 2016 Montreal Protocol meeting in Kigali, Rwanda yielded a global agreement to phase down HFCs. Now countries must ratify and implement the Kigali Amendment! Read and share EIA's briefing on this great opportunity and obligation to avert climate catastrophe.
Help us mitigate climate destroying gases
Where are HFCs used?
What are HFCs?
How to Recycle Your Fridge