If you are looking for EIA UK, it's overhere.

Supermarkets Leading the Way in Eliminating Super-Pollutant HFCs

ALDI U.S. Intends to Add 100 More HFC-Free Stores in 2019

Washington D.C.— This Earth Day, the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) is unveiling a new initiative identifying U.S. retailers committed to taking leadership action to reduce potent greenhouse gases used in cooling, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). As part of this initiative, ALDI U.S. announced its intent to add 100 more stores in 2019 with HFC-free refrigeration systems.

“In a time of acute need for leadership on climate change, the U.S. retail sector has remained a laggard in adopting climate-friendly cooling compared to their counterparts in rest of the developed world,” said Avipsa Mahapatra, Climate Campaign Lead, EIA. “Smart companies, such as ALDI U.S., committed to rapidly scaling up energy efficient HFC-free technologies, demonstrate that it makes business and climate sense to lead in adopting future-proof refrigeration systems not reliant on potent super-pollutants.”

“ALDI is deeply committed to reducing its refrigerant emissions and believes natural refrigerants are the best long-term solution for the planet,” said Aaron Sumida, Vice President at ALDI. “To put this value into practice, ALDI has adopted transcritical CO2 refrigeration systems in many of its new and remodeled stores and targets 100 more in 2019. We’re excited to continue to drive forward change with our commitment to hydrofluorocarbon reduction and adopting natural refrigeration systems.”

EIA analysis found ALDI U.S. as a standout leader, along with Whole Foods, Target, Sprouts, and Ahold Delhaize USA as companies taking significant steps to reduce HFCs and increase energy efficiency in refrigeration. These companies are profiled in a new web platform launched today, www.climatefriendlysupermarkets.org. The site provides a map of supermarket locations in the U.S. using climate-friendly cooling and highlights specific company actions in three key areas: adopting technologies, refrigerant management, and engaging in technical and policy dialogue.

"For nearly 40 years since we opened our first store, Whole Foods Market has been committed to environmental sustainability, and finding new opportunities to reduce our energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions,” said Aaron Daly, Principal, Global Director of Energy Management, Whole Foods Market. “We currently have 30 stores using low-GWP refrigeration systems including CO2, propane and ammonia and have adopted propane self-contained cases across the entire chain. We have seen great results from our low GWP projects to date and continue to invest in innovation, exploring new approaches to reducing HFCs while addressing the varying needs of food retail refrigeration.”

"We are committed to limiting our climate footprint, including taking steps to reduce HFCs used in cooling,” said Brittni Furrow, VP of Sustainable Retailing for Ahold Delhaize USA. “Our company's global target to lower the average global warming potential of refrigerants in stores to 2,230 by the year 2020 reflects this commitment. We also continue to look for opportunities to use climate-friendly cooling technologies like those already employed in one Food Lion and three Hannaford stores in the U.S."

Frank Davis, Director of Facilities and Engineering at Sprouts Farmers Market, said, “At Sprouts, we are committed to lowering HFC emissions from cooling by reducing leaks and piloting sustainable refrigeration technologies in stores. We continue to follow through on this commitment through our participation and certification of stores in EPA's GreenChill Partnership."

“We commend this small group of companies for taking action, but there is much more U.S. supermarkets can and must do,” said Christina Starr, Climate Policy Analyst at EIA. “These leading companies represent just 15% of the sector, so there’s a big opportunity for more commitments to phase out the worst HFCs like R404A, adopt climate-friendly technologies, and join the EPA’s GreenChill Partnership to reduce leaks.”

If all U.S. supermarkets join the EPA’s GreenChill Partnership and achieve similar reduced leak rates, it would mitigate an additional 15.5 million metric tons CO2e annually. For more information visit: www.climatefriendlysupermarkets.org

Notes to Editors:

  1. The average supermarket refrigeration system contains thousands of pounds of HFCs that leak out over time. These high Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerants – leaking from 38,000 supermarkets across the U.S. – emit up to 45 million metric tons CO2 equivalent annually.

  2. The HFCs used as refrigerants in most supermarkets have a GWP of up to 4,000, whereas systems adopted by companies identified leaders here use refrigerants like carbon dioxide, propane, and ammonia, have an ultra-low GWP, that is near zero. These refrigerants are often colloquially called “natural refrigerants” as opposed to synthetic patented fluorochemicals.

  3. Reducing average refrigerant GWP in all U.S. supermarkets by 50% would shrink refrigerant emissions in the U.S. by 22.7 million metric tons CO2e annually in 2025.

View all Press Releases

Recent Blog Posts

A Week of Climate Action on HFCs and Cooling
09/17/2018
HFCs used in cooling were a hot topic at the Global Climate Action Summit last week in San Francisco. With momentum building for subnational actors like cities, states, and businesses to drive action forward on climate, we have the opportunity to tackle the issue of how we keep cool without warming the planet - by phasing down superpollutant hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and identifying new approaches to maximize energy efficiency as global demand for cooling increases.
EIA Statement: China Takes Action on Illegal CFC-11 Production and Use Following EIA Report
08/06/2018
China has identified illegal production and use of CFC-11 as part of ongoing investigations following the July publication of an EIA report, Blowing It, that revealed Chinese companies using CFC-11 – a banned ozone-destroying chemical – in blowing agents used for producing foam insulation.

Recent Reports

High Stakes: Implementing and strengthening climate and ozone commitments under the Montreal Protocol
06/27/2019
High Stakes: Implementing and strengthening climate and ozone commitments under the Montreal Protocol
Search, Reuse, and Destroy: How States Can Take the Lead on a 100 Billion Ton Climate Problem
02/14/2019
Preventing emissions of fluorinated refrigerants such as HFCs from “F-gas banks” is the single biggest near-term strategy to reduce greenhouse gases. The IPCC special report on limiting global warming to within 1.5˚C also underlined need for faster and deeper HFC emission reductions beyond those anticipated under full implementation of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol.

Recent Press Releases

California Green Lights Incentive Program to Reduce HFCs
06/14/2019
This week California’s legislature approved a 2019-2020 budget providing $1 million to create an incentive program for reducing emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases, including hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Established by the California Cooling Act (SB1013) passed last year, the program will incentivize adoption of climate-friendly refrigerant technologies, with a mandate to also consider other co-benefits such as energy efficiency and opportunities for increasing recovery, reclamation, and destruction of refrigerants at end-of-life.
New Atmospheric Study Pinpoints Large-scale CFC-11 Emissions in Eastern China
05/23/2019
New Atmospheric Study Pinpoints Large-scale CFC-11 Emissions in Eastern China

Recent Videos

Blowing It
07/08/2018
Information obtained by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) demonstrates conclusively that the use of CFC-11 in China’s rigid polyurethane (PU) foam insulation sector, in particular in the building and construction subsector, is widespread and pervasive. CFC-11 is used as a foam blowing agent for the manufacture of molded foam panels and spray foam used for insulation purposes
Follow us @eiaenvironment on twitter for the latest updates!
What are the HFC-free Technologies?
Widespread adoption of HFC-free technologies is cost-effective, energy efficient, and climate-friendly. Read EIA’s report Putting the Freeze on HFCs for hundreds of examples of HFC-free technologies available and in use today.
Where are HFCs used?
What are HFCs?
How to Recycle Your Fridge
Help us mitigate climate destroying gases