If you are looking for EIA UK, it's overhere.

Supermarkets Leading the Way in Eliminating Super-Pollutant HFCs

ALDI U.S. Intends to Add 100 More HFC-Free Stores in 2019

Washington D.C.— This Earth Day, the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) is unveiling a new initiative identifying U.S. retailers committed to taking leadership action to reduce potent greenhouse gases used in cooling, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). As part of this initiative, ALDI U.S. announced its intent to add 100 more stores in 2019 with HFC-free refrigeration systems.

“In a time of acute need for leadership on climate change, the U.S. retail sector has remained a laggard in adopting climate-friendly cooling compared to their counterparts in rest of the developed world,” said Avipsa Mahapatra, Climate Campaign Lead, EIA. “Smart companies, such as ALDI U.S., committed to rapidly scaling up energy efficient HFC-free technologies, demonstrate that it makes business and climate sense to lead in adopting future-proof refrigeration systems not reliant on potent super-pollutants.”

“ALDI is deeply committed to reducing its refrigerant emissions and believes natural refrigerants are the best long-term solution for the planet,” said Aaron Sumida, Vice President at ALDI. “To put this value into practice, ALDI has adopted transcritical CO2 refrigeration systems in many of its new and remodeled stores and targets 100 more in 2019. We’re excited to continue to drive forward change with our commitment to hydrofluorocarbon reduction and adopting natural refrigeration systems.”

EIA analysis found ALDI U.S. as a standout leader, along with Whole Foods, Target, Sprouts, and Ahold Delhaize USA as companies taking significant steps to reduce HFCs and increase energy efficiency in refrigeration. These companies are profiled in a new web platform launched today, www.climatefriendlysupermarkets.org. The site provides a map of supermarket locations in the U.S. using climate-friendly cooling and highlights specific company actions in three key areas: adopting technologies, refrigerant management, and engaging in technical and policy dialogue.

"For nearly 40 years since we opened our first store, Whole Foods Market has been committed to environmental sustainability, and finding new opportunities to reduce our energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions,” said Aaron Daly, Principal, Global Director of Energy Management, Whole Foods Market. “We currently have 30 stores using low-GWP refrigeration systems including CO2, propane and ammonia and have adopted propane self-contained cases across the entire chain. We have seen great results from our low GWP projects to date and continue to invest in innovation, exploring new approaches to reducing HFCs while addressing the varying needs of food retail refrigeration.”

"We are committed to limiting our climate footprint, including taking steps to reduce HFCs used in cooling,” said Brittni Furrow, VP of Sustainable Retailing for Ahold Delhaize USA. “Our company's global target to lower the average global warming potential of refrigerants in stores to 2,230 by the year 2020 reflects this commitment. We also continue to look for opportunities to use climate-friendly cooling technologies like those already employed in one Food Lion and three Hannaford stores in the U.S."

Frank Davis, Director of Facilities and Engineering at Sprouts Farmers Market, said, “At Sprouts, we are committed to lowering HFC emissions from cooling by reducing leaks and piloting sustainable refrigeration technologies in stores. We continue to follow through on this commitment through our participation and certification of stores in EPA's GreenChill Partnership."

“We commend this small group of companies for taking action, but there is much more U.S. supermarkets can and must do,” said Christina Starr, Climate Policy Analyst at EIA. “These leading companies represent just 15% of the sector, so there’s a big opportunity for more commitments to phase out the worst HFCs like R404A, adopt climate-friendly technologies, and join the EPA’s GreenChill Partnership to reduce leaks.”

If all U.S. supermarkets join the EPA’s GreenChill Partnership and achieve similar reduced leak rates, it would mitigate an additional 15.5 million metric tons CO2e annually. For more information visit: www.climatefriendlysupermarkets.org

Notes to Editors:

  1. The average supermarket refrigeration system contains thousands of pounds of HFCs that leak out over time. These high Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerants – leaking from 38,000 supermarkets across the U.S. – emit up to 45 million metric tons CO2 equivalent annually.

  2. The HFCs used as refrigerants in most supermarkets have a GWP of up to 4,000, whereas systems adopted by companies identified leaders here use refrigerants like carbon dioxide, propane, and ammonia, have an ultra-low GWP, that is near zero. These refrigerants are often colloquially called “natural refrigerants” as opposed to synthetic patented fluorochemicals.

  3. Reducing average refrigerant GWP in all U.S. supermarkets by 50% would shrink refrigerant emissions in the U.S. by 22.7 million metric tons CO2e annually in 2025.

View all Press Releases

Recent Blog Posts

Can I be HFC-free? A Quest for Climate-friendly Cooling
08/10/2020
Supermarkets in particular have enormous refrigeration systems that extend past the display cases to back room chillers, refrigerated trucks, cold warehouses and so on. With such large systems, supermarkets are among the largest corporate offenders of HFC use, with thousands of tons of these chemicals throughout their cold chain. Yet out of nearly 40,000 supermarkets in the U.S., barely 1% are known to have transitioned to HFC-free systems; our Supermarket Scorecard shows that action and change throughout the industry is needed. These large companies have a greater climate footprint than you or me, and thus a greater responsibility to transition to climate-friendly alternatives.
Finding the Promise in Compromise: EIA Proposal to Jumpstart California HFC Reclaim
07/27/2020
Last week EIA participated in California’s Air Resources Board (ARB) 6th workshop on proposed regulations to reduce emissions of super pollutant hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in cooling. The state’s rigorous process for proposing new regulations on HFC refrigerants has been ongoing for several years now and is in the final stretch. Opportunities for stakeholder engagement have been abundant and ARB has invited input from industry along the way. They even aligned with an industry proposed 2023 deadline for transitioning new air conditioning equipment to refrigerants with a global warming potential (GWP) less than 750.

Recent Reports

The Risk of Ozone-Depletion Persists - Comments to EPA
10/15/2020
EIA submitted comments to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regarding the draft risk assessments of methylene chloride, carbon tetrachloride, and other priority chemicals undergoing risk evaluations under the Amended Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).
EIA Briefing on the IEC Standards Proposal for Air Conditioning
10/08/2020
With global stock of household air conditioners (ACs) expected to triple by 2050, continued use of HFCs in ACs is fueling the climate crisis.

Recent Press Releases

100,000+ Consumers Say Walmart Should Not Put Off Curbing Climate-Harming Refrigerants for 20 Years
09/21/2020
New Announcement Waiting Until 2040 to Phase Out HFCs Leaves Walmart Way Behind Competitors – Including Aldi, Target, and Whole Foods – Who Already Have Taken Action
Unlocking Kigali Amendment Climate Benefits
08/17/2020
A new safety standard proposed by an International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) working group is vital to maximizing emission reductions from a global phase-down of super pollutant hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs)
What are the HFC-free Technologies?
Widespread adoption of HFC-free technologies is cost-effective, energy efficient, and climate-friendly. Read EIA’s report Putting the Freeze on HFCs for hundreds of examples of HFC-free technologies available and in use today.
A Global HFC Phase-down
The October 2016 Montreal Protocol meeting in Kigali, Rwanda yielded a global agreement to phase down HFCs. Now countries must ratify and implement the Kigali Amendment! Read and share EIA's briefing on this great opportunity and obligation to avert climate catastrophe.
Help us mitigate climate destroying gases
Where are HFCs used?
What are HFCs?
How to Recycle Your Fridge