If you are looking for EIA UK, it's overhere.

"Open Door" to Traffickers - An EIA/AVG briefing about Malagasy rosewoods, ebonies and palisanders for CITES SC69

At COP17 in 2016, CITES parties approved a new Action Plan for Madagascar in an effort to assist the country to finally solve the country’s rosewood crisis and stop illegal trafficking in precious woods. The CITES Secretariat, as well as EIA and other observers had then found that the previous action plan, adopted in 2013, had still not been implemented. A year later, at the Standing Committee’s 69th meeting in 2017, EIA and AVG issue yet another update, the conclusions of which sound awkwardly identical to those at SC66 and 67

The government of Madagascar is still not fulfilling its commitments under the 2016 Action Plan outlined in Decisions 17.203-8 regarding its populations of ebonies, palisanders, and rosewoods. Despite substantial support from international organizations, the Malagasy government has failed to implement the key activities of the Action Plan, including a comprehensive stockpile assessment and effective enforcement measures against illegal logging and trade. Powerful timber barons, well connected to political elites, continue to walk free and are even running for the Senate, while civil society workers and local officials who try to stop the illegalities continue to be intimidated, harassed and incarcerated.

Instead of taking decisive action to end the illegal trade, Madagascar has repeatedly requested to sell its stockpiles and reopen the rosewood trade in recent years, and does so again in the document submitted to SC69. With upcoming presidential elections in 2018, the requests from Madagascar to SC69 are getting bolder and riskier: It proposes a “business plan” to dispose of its illegal stockpiles by paying alleged owners of illegal wood through an “open-door” approach. Over 7 million dollars of international money could thus land directly in the hands of illegal loggers and traffickers. In addition, Madagascar is asking the CITES Secretariat to “facilitate” the sales of precious woods that have been seized by countries such as Singapore, Sri Lanka or Kenya, in order to repatriate parts of the proceeds.

EIA and AVG Madagascar recommend that SC69:

• Adopt and reinstate the trade embargo on Malagasy precious woods

• Reject and fundamentally reconsider the premature and dangerous business plan for stockpile disposal

• Clarify the term “stockpile” in the Action Plan to cover both seized and unseized logs

• Prevent any sales of illegal logs outside of Madagascar, until save and transparent disposal plans are developed ensuring potential sales do not stimulate further illegal trade

Download EIA's briefing, "Open Door" to Trafficking

Photo Credit: Dan Ashby and Lucy Taylor for Mongabay

View all Reports

Recent Blog Posts

Singapore Court Returns Nearly 30,000 Illegal Madagascar Rosewood Logs to Trafficker
04/24/2019
Singapore Court Returns Nearly 30,000 Illegal Madagascar Rosewood Logs to Trafficker
South Korea Says "아니요" (No) to Illegal Timber
11/08/2018
South Korea has joined the ranks of countries prohibiting the import of illegal timber.

Recent Reports

Toxic Trade: Forest Crime in Gabon and the Republic of Congo and Contamination of the US Market
03/25/2019
For four years, EIA has investigated the logging sector in the Congo and Gabon, countries that together account for approximately 60 percent of the total area under forest management in the Congo Basin. EIA’s findings reveal that one of the largest and most influential Chinese timber companies in Africa, the “Dejia Group,” has built its business model on bribery and crime.
Commerce Toxique
03/24/2019
Pendant quatre ans, l’Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) a enquêté sur le secteur de l’exploitation forestière au Gabon et en République du Congo, deux pays qui représentent environ 60% de la super cie totale allouée à l’exploitation forestière dans le bassin du Congo.

Recent Press Releases

Toxic Trade: Forest Crime in Gabon and the Republic of Congo and Contamination of the US Market
03/25/2019
For four years, EIA has investigated the logging sector in the Congo and Gabon, countries that together account for approximately 60 percent of the total area under forest management in the Congo Basin. EIA’s findings reveal that one of the largest and most influential Chinese timber companies in Africa, the “Dejia Group,” has built its business model on bribery and crime.
New LEED Credit Rewards Timber Transparency and Traceability
03/19/2019
New LEED credit rewards timber transparency and traceability

Recent Videos

Authorized Plunder
12/12/2018
A new report by EIA, Authorized Plunder, documents the sale of 180,000 rosewood logs in Guinea-Bissau, enabled by the Secretariat of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), is fueled by high-level corruption, encourages illegal logging, and threatens local communities.
În Spatele Scenelor: Cum se ascund distrugerile pădurilor antice din Europa
07/26/2018
În Spatele Scenelor: Cum se ascund distrugerile pădurilor antice din Europa
Follow us @eiaenvironment on twitter for the latest updates!