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Transitioning HFCs in India: The Opportunity for Climate Friendly Cooling in the Fast Food Industry

Transitioning HFCs in India, studies some of the fastest growing multinational fast food chains in India – a country with significantly increasing HFC emissions due to its expanding market. Eight fast food chains in India could add nearly 970,000 metric tons of CO2 equivalent in HFC emissions by 2020. This cumulative impact is equivalent to the annual emissions of 205,000 cars.

Fast food restaurants, some of the fastest-growing multinational corporations, typically contain multiple types of refrigeration equipment, such as reach-in refrigerators, walk-in freezers, soda fountain machines and more. In addition to onsite refrigeration, companies also store products in cold storage warehouses and transport these products in refrigerated transport systems.

The fast food chains covered include American-based companies like McDonald’s, Starbucks, Subway, and Dunkin Donuts, as well as Indian-based company Café Coffee Day, and UK-based Hindustan Unilever. By transitioning away from HFC technology in the short term, these companies could do their part for the climate, through direct emissions reductions and increased energy efficiency.

Read the full report here.

Correction: Hindustan Unilever Limited is based in India and is a subsidiary of UK-based Unilever.

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